The Meadowlark Blog
Meadowlark Design+Build

In America, most of us enter our homes through our attached garages, and the glamorous front door entry is typically used by the more formal guests that visit for a dinner party or a special occasion. Thus, the most used entry becomes a space that usually is dark, overcrowded and has little organization to accommodate the daily traffic.

Dark and Crowded Mudrooms

The mudroom is typically a space with very poor lighting and little (if any) natural light. In most homes, mudrooms seem more of an afterthought—a means to enter the home solely for utility. Lighter finishes and proper lighting can make big changes in how these spaces can feel…plus more light is always helpful when looking for those lost pair of mittens or rain boots. Well-designed cabinetry takes care of the overcrowding and creates spaces to take care of every family members “stuff.”

Take Advantage of Light

As I have designed residences, I have been enlightened by the use of natural light to allow these mudroom spaces to grow without adding any square footage at all. Adding windows or doors with full-lite glass allows mudrooms to feel and appear more open. Transparent glass allows our line of sight to be continuous and not be limited by the exterior walls, letting the spaces breathe and feel larger than they actually are. In addition, clerestory windows are a great alternative to help to bring in light without taking up valuable wall space and Solatubes can capture light and act like skylights and can be placed in areas that have attic space above.

Add a “Pop” of Color

Lighter finishes help brighten…but why not add some fun as well? We frequently use a flooring product called Marmoleum in mudrooms, laundry rooms and basements. It’s durable, sustainable and comes in literally hundreds of colors, textures and designs.

Sometimes, a simple change can make a huge difference and open a space up to some beautiful, previously unseen views. Talk to a good designer to see how you can maximize the function of your mudroom space.

By Melissa Kennedy